SQUADDD
drugsruleeverythingaroundme:

D.R.E.A.M. - Drugs rule everything around me
drugsruleeverythingaroundme:

D.R.E.A.M. - Drugs rule everything around me
becausefutbol:

When your team needed to score like five minutes ago.  Team Hyundai knows the feeling. #BecauseFutbol [created by mcgnarcal]

becausefutbol:

When your team needed to score like five minutes ago.  Team Hyundai knows the feeling. #BecauseFutbol [created by mcgnarcal]

drugsandtvshowsallday:

Fuck yeah drugs and tv shows ☣
sean-virgo:

Tonight’s Red SuperMoon Rising over Brooklyn, NYC. 07/12/14 #sky #moon #supermoon #nasa #craters #red #astronomy #space #astrophotography #night #brooklyn #nature #naturalbeauty #sonyhx400 #snapshots #seanvirgo

sean-virgo:

Tonight’s Red SuperMoon Rising over Brooklyn, NYC. 07/12/14 #sky #moon #supermoon #nasa #craters #red #astronomy #space #astrophotography #night #brooklyn #nature #naturalbeauty #sonyhx400 #snapshots #seanvirgo

futurejournalismproject:

Space is a Beautiful Place

The Royal Greenwich Observatory announced the finalists for its sixth annual Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition. Here are a few that made the cut. Winners will be announced in September.

01: Ivan Eder (top)
Royal Observatory… says: Situated 7500 light years away in the ‘W’-shaped constellation of Cassiopeia, the Heart Nebula is a vast region of glowing gas, energized by a cluster of young stars at its centre. The image depicts the central region, where dust clouds are being eroded and moulded into rugged shapes by the searing cosmic radiation.

02: Anneliese Possberg
Royal Observatory… says: The spectacular Northern Lights pictured unfolding over a fjord, in Skjervøy, Troms, Norway. The vibrant colours are produced at various altitudes by different atmospheric gases, with blue light emitted by nitrogen and green by oxygen. Red light can be produced by both gases, while purples, pinks and yellows occur where the various colours mix and intersect.

03: Mark Hanson
Royal Observatory… says: This colourful starscape taken from Rancho Hidalgo, New Mexico, USA reveals the searing heat of the Crescent Nebula glowing in a whirl of red and blue. The emission nebula is a colossal shell of material ejected from a powerful but short-lived Wolf-Rayet star (WR 136), seen close to the image centre. Ultraviolet radiation and stellar wind now heats the swelling cloud, causing it to glow.

Want More?
Photos for the RGO competition are on Flickr. You can view the 14 finalists here. You can view the 2,500 or so submissions here.

Images: Select to embiggen.

distant-traveller:

SN 1006 supernova remnant

A new star, likely the brightest supernova in recorded human history, lit up planet Earth’s sky in the year 1006 AD. The expanding debris cloud from the stellar explosion, found in the southerly constellation of Lupus, still puts on a cosmic light show across the electromagnetic spectrum. In fact, this composite view includes X-ray data in blue from the Chandra Observatory, optical data in yellowish hues, and radio image data in red. Now known as the SN 1006 supernova remnant, the debris cloud appears to be about 60 light-years across and is understood to represent the remains of a white dwarf star. Part of a binary star system, the compact white dwarf gradually captured material from its companion star. The buildup in mass finally triggered a thermonuclear explosion that destroyed the dwarf star. Because the distance to the supernova remnant is about 7,000 light-years, that explosion actually happened 7,000 years before the light reached Earth in 1006. Shockwaves in the remnant accelerate particles to extreme energies and are thought to be a source of the mysterious cosmic rays.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, Zolt Levay (STScI)

distant-traveller:

SN 1006 supernova remnant

A new star, likely the brightest supernova in recorded human history, lit up planet Earth’s sky in the year 1006 AD. The expanding debris cloud from the stellar explosion, found in the southerly constellation of Lupus, still puts on a cosmic light show across the electromagnetic spectrum. In fact, this composite view includes X-ray data in blue from the Chandra Observatory, optical data in yellowish hues, and radio image data in red. Now known as the SN 1006 supernova remnant, the debris cloud appears to be about 60 light-years across and is understood to represent the remains of a white dwarf star. Part of a binary star system, the compact white dwarf gradually captured material from its companion star. The buildup in mass finally triggered a thermonuclear explosion that destroyed the dwarf star. Because the distance to the supernova remnant is about 7,000 light-years, that explosion actually happened 7,000 years before the light reached Earth in 1006. Shockwaves in the remnant accelerate particles to extreme energies and are thought to be a source of the mysterious cosmic rays.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, Zolt Levay (STScI)

amnhnyc:

This diagram shows our cosmic address at a glance. We see our planetary system around the Sun, our stellar neighborhood in our galaxy, our galaxy in the local group of galaxies, and our group in the entire universe. 
Learn more in the Cullman Hall of the Universe. 

amnhnyc:

This diagram shows our cosmic address at a glance. We see our planetary system around the Sun, our stellar neighborhood in our galaxy, our galaxy in the local group of galaxies, and our group in the entire universe. 

Learn more in the Cullman Hall of the Universe